December 10 - December 17, 2017

A number of sleeper hits that shine light on what matters during childhood and adolescence, a few fun year-in-review pieces, and more news on phones and schools.

Also, in recent weeks, some articles have reaffirmed the importance of content in the learning process.  It's the foundation upon which our skills are learned, tested, and honed.  The piece this week on "intense interests" seems to further affirm the role of content in cognitive development. Enjoy this, and others!

Happy holiday season, for holidays of all kinds!

Peter


FEATURED ARTICLES

Having 'Intense Interests' Fuels Cognitive growth (In Elementary School) CNN
"A 2008 study found that sustained intense interests, particularly in a conceptual domain like dinosaurs, can help children develop increased knowledge and persistence, a better attention span, and deeper information-processing skills."

A Short, Helpful, Historical Look At 'Active Learning' Long View on Education
"But as Kate Lacey notes, active/passive does not work as a simple binary, but as a fractal distinction, where what counts as 'active' shifts with context: listening is active in contrast to hearing, but listening counts as passive in relation to speaking, and both listening and speaking count as passive in relation to movement."




ADOLESCENCE

Dating Violence Is An Important Issue For Schools To Get Ahead Of  Atlantic
"More than one-third of 10th graders (35 percent) have been physically or verbally abused by dating partners, while a similar percentage are perpetrators of such abuse."

Drugs And Cigarettes Are Down, Marijuana And Vaping Are Up NPR

"The Importance Of Dumb Mistakes In College" New York Times




ASSESSMENT

How The Khan Lab School Defines And Assesses Mastery Mast. Trans. Cons.




COGNITIVE SCIENCE

Retrieval Practice Appears To be The Best Learning Strategy [PDF] Purdue




EARLY CHILDHOOD

Can Kindness Be Taught? Enter: The Kindness Curriculum New York Times

More On The Importance Of Quality Preschool New York Times
"It's not just that the Tulsa preschoolers were ahead of their peers academically when they got to kindergarten... When the researchers used the Tulsa data to project the impact of the program into adulthood, they concluded that because of those youngsters' higher projected income and diminished likelihood of incarceration, every dollar invested in quality preschool could generate a two-dollar return."




HIGHER ED

From What Majors Are Students Most Likely To Change Majors? Inside Higher Ed




HUMANITIES

A Set Of Articles About Humanities Research In The Digital Age Stanford




LEADERSHIP

Questions For Leaders (To Consider Those Being Led) Swissmiss




PEDAGOGY

Reflections On How To Run "20% Time" In Schools KQED




PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

On The Importance Of "Finding Your Tribe" As A Teacher EdSurge




READING/WRITING

A Theory Of Writing Instruction In The English Class Medium
"It is our mission as English teachers to teach writing as a method of thinking, to re-mediate their writing for current and future circumstances and technologies, and to help our students find a sense of agency and empowerment in the act of writing."




STEM

Best Science Books Of 2017 Brain Pickings

Reflections On Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, After 90 Years Nature




TECH

"The Seven Deadly Sins Of AI Predictions" MIT Technology Review

"MIT Is Building A Better 3D Printer" Hackaday

"Neural Networks Are Learning... What To... Forget" MIT Technology Review

The Mere Presence Of Your Phone Diminishes Social Happiness Technology

France Moves To Ban Phones From School For Kids Under Age 15 NPR
"The French educational code has banned using phones in class in elementary and secondary schools since 2010. As a result, phones are supposed to be kept in students' backpacks. But apparently that's not what happens... France's education chief says that when students go back to school next fall, all mobile phones will be banned in schools for students roughly 15 and younger."




OTHER

How Three 20-Somethings Shut Down Much Of The Internet Wired
"Three young American computer savants pleaded guilty to masterminding an unprecedented botnet--powered by unsecured internet-of-things devices like security cameras and wireless routers--that unleashed sweeping attacks on key internet services around the globe last fall. What drove them wasn't anarchist politics or shadowy ties to a nation-state.  It was Minecraft."

Some Reflections On Learning From People Vs. Books LinkedIn

On The Importance Of Taking--And Revisiting--Notes Austin Kleon

"2017 Educational Research Highlights" Edutopia