September 15 - September 22, 2019

So many great posts this week:

This week's feature article on teacher networks beautifully and thoroughly tells a story that makes tangible what we have known for some time: that the best teacher growth comes from teachers working collaboratively on improving instructional practices and aligning them with curricular objectives.  Or as I like to put it: teachers talking with teachers about teaching.  This article beautifully weaves these component parts together.

I also find particularly compelling Larry Cuban's two-part post about the centrality of good teaching to changing the lives of students.  In a tiered education system, from great schools to weak schools, the ultimate changemaker for student mobility isn't the size of the school, the amount of technology, or other structural characteristics; it's the quality of the teaching: deeper teacher knowledge and skills in classroom instruction.  The messy (and glorious) work of how people act and interact is the most important work of all.

These and other posts this week, enjoy!

Peter Nilsson
King's Academy
Jordan



FEATURED ARTICLES

“Measuring Actual Learning Versus Feeling Of Learning” Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences
“We compared students’ self-reported perception of learning with their actual learning under controlled conditions in large-enrollment introductory college physics courses taught using 1) active instruction (following best practices in the discipline) and 2) passive instruction (lectures by experienced and highly rated instructors)… Students in active classrooms learned more (as would be expected based on prior research), but their perception of learning, while positive, was lower than that of their peers in passive environments. This suggests that attempts to evaluate instruction based on students’ perceptions of learning could inadvertently promote inferior (passive) pedagogical methods… We discuss strategies that instructors can use, early in the semester, to improve students’ response to being actively engaged in the classroom.”

Collaboration And Peer Networks Are Essential For Teacher Growth Atlantic
“In this model of professional development, peer networks became the main mechanism for transferring collective wisdom and acquiring tacit knowledge that can’t be learned by reading a book or listening to a lecture—skills such as designing a strong lesson plan with precise pacing, rhythm, and clear focus, for instance, or building positive relationships among students. When teachers plan classroom activities together, educators have a chance to implement improvements as a cohesive effort across the building, develop a shared vision and common language around learning goals, and learn how to detect outcomes using a broad range of data, including markers for key skills, such as resilience or collaboration, that can’t be captured using standardized test scores.”






ADOLESCENCE

The Vaping Crisis: Through The Lens Of One School New York Times




CHARACTER

“Why Children Become Bullies At School” BBC

“How To Disagree Better” - 3 Tips For Constructive Debate [Video] New York Times

Asking Students To Give Advice Might Improve Their Own Work Character Lab




DIVERSITY/INCLUSION

Merriam Webster Adds “They” As Gender Nonbinary Guardian





HIGHER EDUCATION

New Mexico: Free College For State Residents New York Times

Graduate Programs Are Dropping The GRE (Princeton) Inside Higher Education




HISTORY OF EDUCATION

“How My Thinking About School Reform Has Changed Over Decades (Part 1)” Larry Cuban
“Both my experience and research have changed my mind about the role of schools in society. I have become skeptical of anyone spouting words about schools being in the vanguard of social reform—even from a President I admire. Yet, I must confess that in my heart, I still believe that content-smart and classroom-smart teachers who know their students well can make significant differences in their students’ lives even if they cannot cure societal ills.”


“How My Thinking About School Reform Has Changed Over Decades (Part 2)” Larry Cuban
“Both my experience and research have changed my mind about the role of schools in society. I have become skeptical of anyone spouting words about schools being in the vanguard of social reform—even from a President I admire. Yet, I must confess that in my heart, I still believe that content-smart and classroom-smart teachers who know their students well can make significant differences in their students’ lives even if they cannot cure societal ills.”





HUMANITIES

Miltonists Rejoice: Milton’s Annotated Shakespeare Has Been Found Guardian
“Shakespeare is our most famous writer, and the poet John Milton was his most famous younger contemporary. It was, until a few days ago, simply too much to hope that Milton’s own copy of Shakespeare might have survived — and yet the evidence here so far is persuasive. This may be one of the most important literary discoveries of modern times.”





READING AND WRITING

Three Tips For Raising A Reader Atlantic




SAFETY

Does Social Media Surveillance Help Or Hurt Students? NPR




TECH

Khan Academy Moves To Make School Partnership Official  Chalkbeat
“While the organization says it charged Chicago schools for one-off training sessions in the past, it is now formally selling its services to districts, putting it in direct competition with other education technology vendors.”


A Free Esports Curriculum With Full Lesson Plans The Journal
“The content covers learning standards in areas such as careers in gaming, maintaining healthy practices, self-management and interpersonal communications, as well as an overview of esports gaming.”


Tips for Starting a Podcast Cult of Pedagogy




OTHERS

“How To Help Your Child Succeed At School” New York Times